Tag Archives: Internet

Verizon FIOS: MoCA, Actiontech Router, Ethernet Tested

I have long wondered why my FIOS seemed so slow at home compared with the FIOS that I was used to in the workplace. We recently had Verizon out and I had them switch our programming over to allow us to use the Ethernet port instead of having the Actiontech router get the WAN over MoCA. I did a little test and it seemed like my latency went down about 2-3 ms by going with direct Ethernet instead of using the MoCA. It was an improvement, but it didn’t seem like much.

I downloaded and installed the software from Apple that updates your ethernet settings for high latency connections. I understand it makes your tcp window settings larger which may seem to reduce the effect of the latency. I didn’t save my test results from before and after this, but I did some further testing.

I was concerned that the poor Actiontech router might be slowing things down a bit too. Obviously, any device in the chain is going to impact your performance in some way. For my test I performed a simple test of pinging google.com and apple.com through terminal. I performed about 10 pings each and will report the data as min/avg/max/stddev as reported by terminal. (I should have restricted it to 10 pings each time, but this was an impromptu  test and I didn’t plan it out very well.) I also performed a test on speedtest.net. We are on the 25/25 FIOS plan.

First off was my test of my computer (a MacPro) plugged into the Actiontech/FIOS router. In all tests the Aciontech was connected to the ONT via cat5e/ethernet. Terminal reported 16.401/19.388/21.840/1.818 ms to google.com and 21.259/22.547/24.383/1.340 ms to apple.com. Speedtest reported 25.46 Mb/s down, 19.19 Mb/s up and a ping time of 29 ms.

Secondly, I tested the computer connected directly to the ONT without a router. I first got results of: 19.374/21.092/22.507/1.308 ms to google.com and 23.638/24.259/24.817/0.361 ms to apple. Something had to be wrong! We realized that my DNS settings had changed. I had been using openDNS through the router and the computer was getting the DNS via DHCP and using the router. I manually changed the DNS settings to use OpenDNS directly and immediately noticed an improvement: 18.740/19.428/21.589/0.912 ms to google.com. I must have annoyed the traffic police at apple, as they stopped responding to my icmp requests/pings. Speedtest.net reported 25.47 Mb/s down, 19.92 Mb/s up and 24 ms ping time.

Finally, I tested the computer connected to a NETGEAR RangeMax Wireless-N Gigabit Router with USB WNR3500L (Amazon affiliate link). Terminal reported 18.743/19.741/21.669/0.918 ms to google.com. Speedtest.net reported 26.10 Mb/s down, 19.55 Mb/s up and a ping time of 26 ms.

All speedtest.net tests were reported as if going to the same server in San Diego, CA. Obviously the data was close enough to show that it doesn’t make a difference on the speed, but potentially does on the latency reported through the ping time.

In the end I went back to the Actiontech router since it was free and I didn’t want to pay currently for the Netgear. (I had it here to setup for a customer and figured a quick test wouldn’t hurt anything.) Maybe someday I’ll test a real (Cisco) router in line and see if that changes anything.

Woodpecker Strikes Again

Here is some more information about the woodpecker incident with  my parents Internet and phone problems last week:

The cause of a recent telephone and DSL (Internet) outage in Fallbrook is shown in the following jpeg images:


Note the hole in the black-colored fiberoptic cable splice box (look for the white cord hanging out of the hole).  This is where a woodpecker penetrated the non-metallic box and proceeded to destroy the optical connections inside.  This assault cut off DSL and some phone service for about a day until the telephone company could make repairs (we were first told that repairs could take up to 11 days!)  This was the second successful woodpecker assault at this location in a matter of weeks.

The “white cord” is actually a plastic-like tube containing (I am told) 24 optical fibers.  The tube is about the diameter of a soda straw.  The tube loop shown in the photo was swinging back and forth in the breeze as if to advertise the location of the incident at the intersection of Winterwarm & Alta Vista.

Bob Gonsett

Ready for Bed!

It’s been a long day…

I had a good day in the temple today. It was interesting as we had 120 missionaries or so from the Carlsbad mission show up this morning which gave us a great deal more patrons than we are used to having. There are also certain things with the missionaries that you have to keep in mind and plan for.

I actually ended up having lunch with two of the elders from the San Marcos Stake and their WML. I went to Chipotle after stopping at Krispy Kreme and they were just before me in line. I asked if I could join them instead of sitting by myself.

The sister I feel I’m stalking was in the 9:30 session I was supposed to be in today. I got bumped to the 10:00 session as a follower since there were so many already in the session.

I pretty much only came into the office today to have some meetings.

Shelly and Craig made some great tri-tip for dinner tonight and then I went over to the Dowden’s to take Andrea her chocolate cake doughnuts. She didn’t even eat one though and went for an original! I left her a bunch, so I’m sure she will be enjoying them soon. I took candy to the RS enrichment tonight for Sister Dowden and then ended up staying while they completed their activity as there was no one else in the building.

I had to spend some time troubleshooting my dad’s internet problems tonight and after 35 minutes I finally got someone at AT&T to tell me that they are having an outage. It would have been great if I could have found that information before we spent all this time troubleshooting things inside the house.

PPPOE and Password Change Notifications

So I have to wonder: Is there any purpose behind PPPOE or is it just to increase the total cost of ownership. With Adelphia and our cable modem the only times we had problems connecting was when their servers were done. With AT&T/Yahoo it seems that every time we turn around there is something new. It turns out that they reset our password when we called a few weeks ago about not being able to send email. Fortunately, they were kind enough to send an email notifying me that the password had been changed. There were instructions in the email about if I didn’t change my password, such and such.

Here is the brain teaser for this evening: Let’s say I have an account, which has a password. That account and password are tied together for my DSL modem, email account and online/support login systems. Now, let’s say that someone – not me – changes my password. They are kind enough to send an email informing you to your email account. We’ll ignore the fact that people don’t actually check their DSL email accounts because all they do is collect spam, and continue down the road of pondering. Let’s examine option A: I changed my password or at least know of the new password. I can now login to my DSL, member center and email. The bonus I receive for this is an email telling me that my password has been changed. Great. Obviously I knew it had been changed since I had to type in the new password. Now, Road B: Someone changed my password and I didn’t know about it. Since I didn’t know about it, they were kind enough to send me an email to inform me. Ahh… but you say “WAIT!” You’re probably wondering how you’re supposed to login to your DSL, the member center and your email to find out your password has changed when none of the systems will accept your password because it has changed. I know I’m lost, how about you?

So, back to the real question at hand. What is the point of PPPOE? Why can’t AT&T keep track of the mac address of the modem I have or figure out that I’m coming through the copper they ran to my house? Heck, they could have double security and have both – requiring me not only to have a DSL connection at my house, a valid modem in their MAC address pool, but also to be at the physical location that the MAC address was assigned to! Can anyone figure out what I spent time doing this evening?

The rest of the day went fairly well. I don’t honestly have much to report, or at least don’t have anything to rant about.

Joel Dehlin: You Have the Right to Remain Visible

In response to: Joel Dehlin: You Have the Right to Remain Visible

Maybe it’s just cause I use a Mac and hope for the best in everything, but I don’t worry about someone stealing my credit card number over the Internet. I hope my computer is fairly locked down and sensitive information isn’t going to get out there. I have key information encrypted and I figure the rest while not necessarily public knowledge probably isn’t going to harm me or anyone else if it gets out. Heck, most of my life is already on the Internet, why not let it all out there?

We have to consider the costs of protecting our data. If the costs outweigh the benefits, then why bother? Anti-virus software drives me nuts. I firmly believe that the threat you need to worry about is one that your anti-virus software won’t be ready to deal with. It takes them days to get an update released and to your computer when a new virus is found. By that time the virus could have infected every computer on the planet. Doesn’t someone have to get infected so they can figure out how to prevent it?

As far as credit card information goes. The biggest worry is going to be when you go out to eat and give your card to the waitress or waiter. Who knows where they could be going with it or what they could be doing once they have written down or scanned the information from the card. Heck, I have multiple cards with RFID chips in them now, so you don’t even need to possess my car, just scan my rear-end with an RFID scanner and you’ll have multiple credit cards worth of information.

This is where merchants need to be more careful. They need to take extra steps to ensure that they are protected and they are dealing with who they are lead to believe they are dealing with. I further believe that while our law enforcement officers are busy with other things, some more time needs to be devoted to finding the people who are committing credit card fraud online.

As far as my website history goes, give it out. I have nothing to hide. You’ll probably find that most of my hits go to my own sites, Google, LDS.org, FaceBook and other blogs I read (normally through Google Reader – or the links on the right). The people that need to worry are the ones that have something to hide. I suggest if you have something to hide, instead of worrying about how to hide it, you instead work on removing that problem from your life. Now, I’m not saying that everyone doesn’t deserve some privacy, but let’s keep in mind that anything we do could be on the front page of the newspaper tomorrow. If you would mind if the whole world knew about it, maybe you should be setting a better example for all those that are indeed watching your every move. We can be tremendous examples to others, so let’s try to set our best foot forward always and “raise the bar” or “stand a little taller.”

Would Gordon B. Hinckley have anything to hide on his computer?